Reclaimer Labs is proud to introduce a large seven-segment display for your next project. The boards are easy to use and are thoroughly documented. Firmware libraries are available to get you started with your Arduino or Spark right away. The design is open source, which allows you to modify this display to meet your needs.

Features and Specifications

Each digit is 6.0 inches tall and 4.2 inches wide, much taller than most available seven-segment displays. Each digit uses single-color LEDs, which are available in red, yellow, orange, green, or blue.

 
 

Each digit comes with a decimal point that can be independently controlled. The decimal point is radially symmetric, which creates a colon when two digits are placed next to each other.

 A countdown clock made with these segments. It automatically counts down to the next SpaceX launch. Note the colon for marking hours, minutes, and seconds.

A countdown clock made with these segments. It automatically counts down to the next SpaceX launch. Note the colon for marking hours, minutes, and seconds.

The digits are controlled by a shift register interface. This interface allows multiple units to be daisy chained together using the same three pins. Clock, data, and latch are required. An output enable and a return data line are available; connecting them to your controller is optional. With certain controllers, such as the Arduino and Spark, you can use hardware SPI to ease the firmware requirements. The output enable line can be used for dimming or blinking the display. The return data line can be used for the built-in self-test features, although a hardware jumper is required. The connector is a 0.1 inch female header mounted at a right angle. This allows the use of standard jumper wires and interconnects.

Firmware libraries are under development for Arduino and Spark. These firmware libraries, as well as the hardware design, are open source, so you can integrate your own controller quickly.

Pads are available for you to solder your own controller directly onto one of your segments. This segment becomes the host and can drive the other segments. You can add your own power connector to supply power to the LEDs and a power converter to supply power to both your controller and the digital logic of the segment. Currently, the Arduino Uno, Arduino Micro, Arduino Nano, Sparkfun Nano, Adafruit Nano, Spark Core, and Spark Photon are supported.

The LEDs are driven with constant current, which makes the input voltage flexible. Any DC power supply between 12 and 20 V will work. The digital control circuitry can run from 3.0 to 5.5 V, which simplifies the process of interfacing the segments with 3.3-V-based controllers, such as the Spark, and 5.0-V-based controllers, such as the Arduino.

You can follow the progress of this project by reading our blog.